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CPR - Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Training
29 CFR 1910.151

Woman Doing CPRCardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) training or CPR/AED (Automated External Defibrillator) training is the shortest and most basic of all medical training classes.

 

It typically takes less than four hours to learn and it is the most important medical course you can take. CPR is performed on victims who are not breathing and do not have a pulse. There is no greater emergency.  CPR has the effect of getting much-needed oxygen to the brain, where it can keep the nerves of the brain alive long enough for someone to get the patient's heart beating again.

 

The average national response time for “Emergency Rescue” is 5 to 10 minutes but could be as long as 20 minutes. Brain cells start dying immediately. Irreversible brain damage starts somewhere around 4 minutes. Without immediate CPR the chances of survival are small. The question that must be asked is; what kind of life style will that person lead if someone doesn’t intervene?

 

Is your business prepared? If you or a coworker suffers from a heart attack or sudden cardiac arrest, will someone be prepared to step in and respond? Make your workplace a vital link in the “Chain of Survival.”  

  • Taught by Certified Instructors 
  • Everyone Uses Their Own Manikin 
  • Everyone gets Hands-On-Training 
  • Everyone gets Hands-On-Evaluated 
  • Everyone gets a Certification Card 
  • Everyone gets a CPR Face-shield Keychain 

All CPR classes are not created equal. How to choice a good training company, ask questions:

  • Are you insured? 
  • How many manikins will they bring? 
  • What is the instructor to student ratio? 
  • Are you going over Universal Precautions in depth so we can protect ourselves? 
  • How much hands on time will we get? 
  • If you are doing CPR for children and infants, does the instructor evaluate everyone for that as well? 
  • Do we just watch a video and take a test? 
  • Does everyone get a CPR card? 
  • Does everyone in the class get hands-on training? 
  • Do you do scenario based training for the AED too? 
  • Do they go over calling 9-1-1? 

There should be manikins available for each student in the CPR class to practice doing chest compressions. You can't get the feel of doing compressions correctly by just watching a movie. Good instructors see how students learn and adjust to individual needs. 

 

Don't just get shown how an automated external defibrillator works, you want everyone in the class to have a chance at using one. Make sure you do scenario based training, that is when stress comes in and students learn how to deal with it.

 

Make sure your CPR training covers everything you need. If you're confused in any way, don't hesitate to ask your instructor to clear it up.

 

 

 

 

 ASHI Authorized Training Center Member of the National Preparedness Coalition